New Poodle Owner? Here’s Your Cheat Sheet

New Poodle Owner? Here’s Your Cheat Sheet

Are you thinking that a Poodle will make your life better? You’re right as they have a wonderful temperament and make wonderful family dogs. That said, life with a Standard Poodle, a Miniature Poodle, or a Toy Poodle requires a bit of effort. You’ll want to give your new buddy the best care you can afford, whether you’re starting with a puppy or adopting an older dog. Both options have lots of benefits, but also require certain things from you.

Poodles tend to be a bit shy at first, though their innate curiosity often helps them come around fairly quickly, and routines are important in any canine relationship. Just like welcoming any breed of dog into your home, there will be an adjustment period where they’ll have to get used to new sites, smells, and sounds, not to mention a new safe area such as a crate or mat, new feeding areas, and possibly new foods.

As you can guess, this can be an overwhelming time for any dog and it’s best to plan ahead. Getting everything you need before your new pet comes home will allow you to spend time bonding with it instead of running to the store for supplies. Here are a few things to help you and your pooch through the transition. One of the most important things to have is a supply of the same food your dog has been getting from their previous home. Sudden changes in brands or even a different variety in the same brand can cause serious tummy troubles for your new buddy. Try to keep them on the same food they’re used to as they settle in.Over time, you can then gradually switch them to your chosen brand if needed.

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Space

All pets need a place of their own, be it a crate in their own room or a bed beside yours.

If you’ve got children or other pets in the house, it’s very important that your newest family member has a place that it can go when it’s feeling overwhelmed or scared or even if it just wants to curl up for a peaceful nap.

No matter how big your Poodle is, make sure that the crate or bed you choose fits your dog.

 

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You don’t want to adopt an adult Standard Poodle and try to fit it in a cat bed. To save on costs, buy the most appropriately sized crate you can for the size your dog will be when fully grown.

If you choose to have an indoor playpen for your pet, there are many models and sizes to choose from.

This would be a good opportunity to give your puppy some freedom when you’re home by leaving the pen open so they can come and go as they please, but are not confined to a crate while you’re out.

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Feeding

Your new pup needs its own eating area and dishes, just like you do, especially if you have other pets already. Be sure it has suitable access to food and water dishes that are appropriately sized. Investing in stainless steel dog bowls is a good idea. They clean up much easier than plastic and are less likely to harbor germs that can cause illness. Small dogs don’t need huge dishes; likewise, large dogs don’t need tiny ones. Also, sharing dishes with other pets can lead to food aggression or even to someone being bitten if they feel their meal is in danger. Like most dog breeds, poodles are prone to a number of health issues, such as:

  • Von Willebrand’s disease
  • Sebaceous Adenitis (skin disease)
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Dental Issues

Therefore, making sure that they get the very best quality dog food with the right nutrition is essential.

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Outings

Outings

The next things you’ll need will be a leash and harness. Poodles have a delicate trachea, especially the Toy and Mini types, and using a collar could result in pain or possibly permanent damage. Even Standard Poodle puppies should have a harness or head collar instead of a collar as their exuberant and excitable nature leads to much jumping and leaping. You’ll want to take your new pooch out for regular exercise and the right equipment will make it much more enjoyable for you both. To minimize the damage brought on by boredom, your puppy needs room to run and play. A fenced-in yard or dog park works perfectly if available;if not, regular walks are in order.

Toys

Size-appropriate toys are an important part of your new pups day as well. Of course, the larger the dog, the larger the toys should be, to minimize the chance of choking.

Rope toys,rubber toys, and bones are a good way to relieve boredom and allow your pet to work off some excess energy.

Try to keep safe toys available for them to play with or chew on when they’re alone.

Some toys require a watchful eye and puppies should not be left alone with raw hides or certain types of chewable toys.

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Small pieces that might break off could present choking hazards and those toys are best kept for when your home to monitor the situation. Be sure to replace worn toys before this becomes a problem. There are also toys available for aggressive chewers.

Grooming

Luckily for you, the Poodle is not a breed that sheds, which is great news for people who suffer from pet-related allergies. However, they do require regular coat maintenance and either a groomer or an owner who is willing to learn the techniques needed. The cost of keeping up their regal appearance can be quite pricey as they require trimming about every four to six weeks. If you’re starting out with a puppy, you’ll need to teach it what grooming is all about. Begin with a regular routine that includes lots of praise. A few treats couldn’t hurt either. Make it an enjoyable event for your new little buddy and they’ll be much easier to care for in the coming years. If you’re getting an older dog, chances are they’re familiar with the process, but keep in mind that not all dogs have had the best experiences.

Final Thoughts

Patience is key with pets, always. The main goal in pet ownership is to build a relationship based on trust and caring that will last your pup’s whole life. They may be your little buddy, but you’re their entire world.

Poodle Factsheet

Poodle Factsheet

While poodles are known for their fuzzyness and cuteness, we really need a poodle factsheet to categorize everything you need to know about this beutiful breed.

Poodles are intelligent, trainable animals, and have risen to become the 7th most popular breed for owners in the US. They have an unclear origin even though their presence is seen on the European mainland as far back as the early 15th century. Some think the breed originated in France but also possibly Germany.Germany has a dog called a Pudelhund, which means “splash about-dog.” As Poodles love water, this could refer to their breed. The other option is that the Poodle came from the Barbet which is a French dog.

The Barbet was crossed with a Hungarian water dog, with the possible outcome of the Poodle.However, the Poodle did become France’s official national dog with its strongest link to that country. Poodles were bred for many reasons. From Toy Poodles to Standard Poodles, they make good pets but were originally bred for water retrieval when hunting.

They were also guide and watchdogs, companions, and circus performers. They are still used for some of these original roles. Their intelligence and trainability make them good service dogs and their happy disposition makes them good companions.

Height and Weight

This dog breed comes in three sizes: Toy Poodle, Miniature Poodle,and Standard Poodle. The Standard is the largest at 15 inches or taller, the Miniature is over 11” and under 15”, and the Toy is under 11”. Some of these designations are not recognized by all kennel clubs, especially the smallest of sizes which are playfully referred to as Pocket or Teacup Poodles.

Appearance

Poodles can differ by being an outdoor companion, a lap dog, or one so small it can go anywhere and everywhere with its owner. However, there are similar traits in all sizes. Poodles tend to have a curly coat in solid colors including black, white, cream, brown, and gray, which is thick and usually kept closely cropped. Colorings and markings can deviate but if it is outside of a solid color, they are not recognized by Kennel Clubs. Poodles have round skulls with dropped ears and longer noses. Their tail goes up and is poofy. To keep their curly coats neat, they need brushing every day and full grooming approximately six weeks. If you chose to do the grooming yourself then you will need:

Poodle appearances can vary based on how their coat is styled. There are the traditional poofs left on their joints, whereas other owners chose to crop the whole coat closely. Either way, grooming is a significant factor in keeping up appearances. 

Exercise and Training for Your Poodle

Exercise and Training for Your Poodle

Poodles are dogs that have a lot of energy no matter what size they are. They require daily exercise,including swimming, if they are given the chance. They are fairly laid back when they are indoors and are not fussed about their size and surroundings. Standards are fine in apartments but need their outside time too. If not allowed to get out and burn off energy, they can become mischievous and get into trouble. Poodles enjoy hikes, playtime with the kids, and playing and interacting with people, other dogs, and toys. They are happy to socialize and get exercise. It is important to make sure Poodles are socialized and trained properly with stimulating activity. Socialization is important so the Poodle is calm and confident around people and other animals.If a Poodle is skittish, it might be wise to take them to a trainer. Poodles are highly intelligent and can be trained to be well-behaved pets. 

Health Issues for Poodles

Poodles are active pets. However, as with any dog, Poodles are predisposed to certain medical issues such as:

  • Hip Dysplasia (Standard)
  • Epilepsy
  • Addison’s Disease
  • Thyroid Problems
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Bloat (Standard)
  • Von Willebrand’s Disease
  • Trachea Issues (Toy, Miniature)

These issues can vary based on size. Some apply to all three with others being size specific. It’s important to know of these health issues so you watch for them and choose exercise and food that will help combat them. Each Poodle will have its own set of needs and preferences based on lifestyle, personality traits, and potential medical issues. It is always important to include a dog’s veterinarian in a conversation around both exercise and food,so the best choices are made based on good information. This is a solid step in health maintenance and disease prevention.

Nutrition

Poodles not only need exercise, training, and mental stimulation but also good nutrition. Assessing the right food is crucial in combating potential medical issues and keeping your puppy fit. The first ingredient on any should be named meat followed by animal fats and no artificial ingredients. Along with nutritionally balanced food, Poodles need access to fresh water,but owners should be mindful at meals as it can cause bloat in Standard Poodles.

Toy Poodle Nutrition

Royal Canin X-small Adult

Royal Canin X-small AdultThis recipe has balanced nutrients for a Toy Poodle. It has EPA and DHA for the brain, eyes, and skin, with extra small kibble for little mouths and reduction of tartar build up. It has an easily digestible formula and flavor.

Pros:

  • Extra small kibble
  • Resealable bag

Cons:

  • Higher carbohydrates

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Miniature Poodle Nutrition

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small Breed 

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small Breed An organic option for a Miniature Poodle. It’s grain-free with a balance of meat, vitamins, and minerals. It has omega-3 omega-6 fatty acids to protect skin and coat along with calcium and phosphorus to halt dental issues.

Pros:

  • Free-range chicken
  • Small pieces,
  • Cooked in a grain-free facility

Cons:

  • Pricey
  • Watch calorie intake

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Standard Poodle Nutrition

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain Free

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain FreeProduct has high protein levels with 76% of the protein from fish. This grain- and gluten-free formula that is good for Standard Poodles. There are no artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives and it supports digestive and immune system health. Furthermore, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids ensure a healthy coat. 

Pros:

  • Vitamin E for health
  • Good for bone and joint health

Cons:

  • Strong smell
  • Pricey 

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Final Thoughts

Poodles are great companions. If attention is paid to grooming, health care, and nutrition, they will lead long and healthy lives with their families.

Everything You’ll Ever Need to Know about Poodles

Everything You’ll Ever Need to Know about Poodles

From Miniature Poodles to Standard Poodles, they are wonderful dogs that are intelligent, trainable animals. They are the 7th most popular breed chosen as a canine companion. These lovable dogs have an unclear origin, though Poodle history is long.

There is art that portrays the Poodle breed on the European mainland in the 15th century, also in Spain and with French Royalty. Many think the breed originated in France (the French Poodle) but there is a chance it was actually Germany.

In Germany, there was a dog called Pudelhund, which means “splash about-dog.” Seeing as Poodles love water, this could refer to their breed. The other option is that the Poodle came from the Barbet which is a French dog. This Barbet was potentially crossed with a Hungarian water dog, hence the Poodle.

However, no matter where the Poodle originated, it became France’s official national dog with its strongest link to that country. The Poodle dog was bred for many reasons and includes the Toy Poodle, the Miniature Poodle, the Standard Poodle types, and even the Poodle mix.

They are good pets but were originally bred for water retrieval when hunting. They were also guide dogs and watchdogs, companions, and circus performers. They are still used for some of these original roles. Their intelligence and train ability make them good service dogs and their happy disposition makes them good companions.

Poodle Features

This dog breed is adaptable and can fit most family situations. They are hypoallergenic which is a bonus for people who are allergic to dog hair and dander.

Poodles come in different sizes with each one bringing its traits for a particular living situation. They can be your outdoor companion, your lap dog, or one so little it can go anywhere and everywhere with you. All sizes of Poodles have a curly coat in white, gray, or black that is thick and usually closely cropped.

There are few, if any, dogs that have a similar style. They have round skulls with dropped ears and fairly long noses. Their tail that goes up and is poofy. They need grooming approximately every six weeks. If you chose to do the grooming yourself then you will need:

 It is cheaper to do it this way but takes a little more patience, care, and time. 

Exercise and Training for Your Poodle

Poodles are high energy dogs at any size. They require daily exercise and many will be happy to play in the water given the chance. Even as a puppy, they relax when they are indoors but if not allowed to get out and expend some energy, they can become mischievous and find far less productive ways to get rid of it. You Poodle will enjoy fun things like hikes, playtime with the kids, and romping in the park with outdoor toys.

They are all good ways for them to enjoy their outdoor time. Make sure they are being socialized and trained with stimulating and changing physical activity. Socialization is important so your Poodle is calm and confident around people and other animals. 

Health Issues for Poodles

This dog breed makes lovely and active pets. However, as with any dog, Poodles are predisposed to medical issues such as:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Epilepsy
  • Addison’s Disease
  • Thyroid Problems
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Bloat
  • Von Willebrand’s Disease
  • Sebaceous Adenitis
  • Cataracts
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Gastric Dilatation Volvulus

To combat these health issues,dogs need appropriate food and exercise not only for their breed but their various sizes. Little dogs take more steps so need less intensive exercise. They also need smaller food with some different nutritional content. Each dog will have its own set of needs and preferences based on lifestyle, personality, and potential medical issues.

Make sure to include your dog’s veterinarian in a conversation around both exercise and food so you can make the best choices based on the good information.

Best Food for Your Poodle

Along with physical and mental activity, your pup needs good nutrition. Figuring out the right food is crucial in combating potential medical issues and keeping your Poodle fit.

All dogs need quality protein and fat. The first ingredient on a food’s ingredient list should be named meat. You want named animal fats and no artificial ingredients. Along with good food, make sure they have fresh water through out the day but be mindful at meals as it can cause bloat in the bigger Poodles. 

Best Food for Your Poodle

Food for Your Toy Poodle

 

Royal Canin X-Small Adult

Royal Canin X-Small AdultThis recipe has balanced nutrients with everything your Toy Poodle will need. It has EPA and DHA to support the brain, eyes, and skin.

It has extra small kibble for little mouths and reduces tartar build up. It has an easily digestible formula and flavor that your Toy Poodle will enjoy.

Pros: Extra small kibble, resealable bag

Cons: Higher carbohydrates

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Food for Your Miniature Poodle 

 

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small Breed 

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small BreedThis recipe is a good organic option for your miniature dog. It is grain-free with a balance of meat, vitamins, and minerals.

It has omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids to protect skin and coat, along with calcium and phosphorus to keep dental issues at bay. A great option for your Miniature and even better if they need grain-free food to avoid allergens.

Pros: Organic free-range chicken, bite-size pieces, cooked in a grain-free facility

Cons: Higher price point, watch calorie intake

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Food for Your Standard Poodle  

 

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain-Free

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain-FreeThis premium product has high protein levels with 76% of the protein coming from fish.

It is a good recipe with a special grain- and gluten-free formula that works well for Standard Poodles. There are no artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives and it supports digestive and immune system health.

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids support healthy coats and skin making this a great formula for larger, active dogs. 

Pros: Vitamin E for health, good for bone and joint health

Cons: Strong smell, pricey 

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Final Thoughts

There are many products that will be beneficial for the life style of your puppy. They are high energy dogs and love to enjoy life.Check with your dog’s veterinarian for suggestions on nutrition and ongoing health so your Poodle will be happy and content through out the years.

How to Take Care of a Poodle

How to Take Care of a Poodle

The Poodle is a well-loved breed and the 7th most popular in the US. They are happy, active and very intelligent. They are good hunters, trackers, performers, watchdogs, and companions. Poodles come in Toy, Miniature and Standard size and are generally easy to care for.That being said, they do require regular exercise, good nutrition and grooming to keep them healthy and fit. 

Caring for Your Poodle’s Medical Health

Poodles are active pets. If you own a Poodle and are not a breeder, there are some things you should do for their health and well-being. They should be spayed or neutered for health and population control reasons. Poodles also need to have up to date vaccinations. They need to have their rabies, distemper, parvovirus, and adenovirus vaccines along with the option of getting vaccines for the flu and Lyme disease. If they live in rattlesnake country, there is also a vaccine to combat rattlesnake venom. Along with vaccines, there is also preventative care for your Poodle. Medications to combat fleas, ticks, heart worms, and internal worms are all available. In combination with this preventative care, an owner must have awareness about potential medical issues that are specific to Poodles. These dogs are predisposed to certain medical issues such as:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Epilepsy (and other seizures)
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Addison’s Disease
  • Thyroid Problems
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Blood Clotting
  • Hair Loss
  • dental disease
  • Sebaceous Adenitis
  • Straining to Urinate
  • Bloat
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
  • Von Willebrand’s Disease
  • Trachea Issues

The issue can vary based on size. Some apply to all three sizes with others are more specific. It’s important to know about these health issues to watch for them and choose exercise and food that will potentially combat them. Each Poodle will have its own set of needs and preferences based on lifestyle, personality, and potential medical issues. It is important to include a dog’s veterinarian in a conversation on both exercise and food, so the best choices are made based on valid information for Poodle care.

Exercise and Training to Keep Your Poodle Healthy

Poodles have a lot of energy no matter what size they are. They need multiple walks daily. Their exercise can include swimming if available as many love water. They need their outside time, as if they do not get out and burn off energy, they can get mischievous and into trouble.

Poodles enjoy hikes, playtime with the kids or playing, and interacting with people, other dogs, and toys. They are more than happy to socialize while getting exercise. Activity is good for their overall health but specifically helps their cardiovascular and digestive system.

Poodles need to be socialized and trained properly with stimulating activity. Socialization is important so they are calm and settled with not only people but other animals. If a Poodle is showing anxiety or skittishness, then it might be wise to take them to a professional trainer. They are highly sociable dogs and want to be with you so although they can be alone, the more they are socialized and with the family the better.

Poodle care must include both physical and mental health.

Grooming Care

Poodles have a curly coat that is thick and needs to be groomed or it becomes matted. To keep their curly coats neat, they need brushing every day and full grooming approximately six to eight weeks. If you chose to do the grooming yourself, you will need:

Grooming Care

Poodles do not need to be groomed with traditional poofs on their joints. Many owners chose to crop the whole coat closely. Along with coat care, a Poodle also needs dental care. This needs to go beyond simply having good kibble with dental cleaning properties. Their teeth should be brushed once per day with appropriate dog toothbrush and toothpaste. This is especially applicable to Toy and Miniature sizes as they are more prone to dental issues. Raw hides and chews also help. Try these:

Good Nutrition for Your Poodle

Poodles need exercise, training, mental stimulation but also require good nutrition. Choosing the correct food is important to ward off potential medical issues.Their diet should have quality protein and calcium. The first ingredient on an ingredient list should be named meat followed by animal fats and no artificial ingredients. Food should be grain-free if possible. Make sure you do not overfeed your Poodle as it will lead to weight problems. Your dog’s veterinarian should be able to tell you how much to feed your pup according to their size. It is also often listed on the food package. Along with nutritionally balanced food, Poodles need fresh water available. Owners should be careful with water at meals as it can cause bloat in Standard Poodles. 

Toy Poodle Nutrition

 

Royal Canin X-small Adult

Royal Canin X-small AdultThis formula has balanced ingredients for aToy Poodle. It has EPA and DHA supporting brain, eyes, and skin, with little kibble for tiny mouths. It helps reduce tartar build up. It has a formula that is easily digestible.

Pros:

  • Tiny kibble
  • Resealable bag

Cons:

  • Higher carbs

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Miniature Poodle Nutrition

 

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small Breed 

Caster & Pollux Organix Grain-Free Organic Small BreedAn organic option for the Miniature Poodle. Grain-free with meat, vitamins, and minerals. It has omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids for skin and coat health along with calcium and phosphorus to stop dental issues.

Pros:

  • Free-range chicken
  • Tiny pieces
  • Created in a grain-free facility

Cons:

  • Higher price and calories

See On Chewy.com

Standard Poodle Nutrition

 

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain-Free

Victor Yukon River Salmon & Sweet Potato Grain-FreeThis product has high protein levels with 76% of the protein from fish. It’s a grain- and gluten-free recipe that is great for Standard Poodles. There are no artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives while supporting digestive and immune system health. Furthermore, omega-3 omega-6 fatty acids ensure a healthy coat and skin.

Pros:

  • Vitamin E
  • Supports bone and joint health

Cons:

  • Strong odor
  • Pricey

See On Chewy.com

Final Thoughts

Poodles are great companions and fairly easy to care for. If attention is paid to grooming, health care, and nutrition, they will lead long and healthy lives with their families.

The Best Lifestyles for Owning a Poodle

The Best Lifestyles for Owning a Poodle

The Best Lifestyles for Owning a Poodle

When you are deciding whether or not to bring a Poodle into your home, it’s important to know what type of lifestyle will best fit the personality and needs of a Poodle. Recognized as the world’s 2nd most intelligent dog, the Poodle is task-oriented, easily trained, loving, and loyal. Because of the Poodle’s intelligence, it needs proper mental stimulation to be happy. Fetch and tug of war are not going to challenge this breed’s intellect. Whether you have a Toy Poodle, a Miniature Poodle, a Standard Poodle, a Poodle mix, or even of the tiny teacup Poodles, dog owners must engage with the Poodle and train it to complete complex tasks. It is also critical to note that your Poodle will not do well if you are gone all day. Poodles require companionship and daily exercise. It is a very family-oriented breed that wants to spend time with its pack.

Furthermore, poodles are prone to health issues, such as:

  • Von Willebrand’s Disease
  • Sebaceous Adenitis
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

Therefore, providing your dog with a well-balanced diet is vital.

Today’s Poodle

Even though Poodles were originally bred as working and hunting dogs, Poodles today are mostly indoor dogs that are spoiled rotten! To properly care for your puppy, you must be prepared to devote plenty of time to grooming and training.

Grooming

This is an essential part of being a Poodle owner. If you can afford it, taking your Poodle to the groomer once every two weeks would be ideal. But even if you can do so, you must still be ready to spend substantial time caring for your dog’s coat. The Poodle has a hairy, curly top coat that can get tangled and matted very easily. To avoid this issue, make sure you buy a proper pin brush for regular brushing. You should also plan to bathe your dog at least once every two weeks, if not more. You can find dog shampoo, nail trimmers, hair trimmers, and other grooming supplies at any pet store. If you plan to trim your dog’s nails yourself, make sure you have a vet technician or professional groomer show you the proper way to do so. If you are not shown the proper technique, you could easily injure your dog. 

High-Quality Dog Bed

Environment

Your Poodle’s environment needs to be well set-up before bringing home your dog. There are multiple issues you must consider in setting up your home. Get a High-Quality Dog Bed – when you have a soft, comfortable bed waiting for your new dog, it will be much less likely to experience a high level of anxiety. Put the bed in an area away from the noise and near to the pack leader (usually a parent). Show your new dog the bed when you show it the new home. Leash and Collar – choose a leash that is the right size and weight for your puppy. Believe it or not, the size of the leash does matter. If the leash is too heavy, it will drag on your dog’s neck while walking. If the leash is too short, you will have problems walking the dog because it will always be pulling on the leash. Also, make sure you get a sturdy, comfortable collar and a harness. Poodles are prone to windpipe collapse, so it is vital to your dog’s safety to not use a leash with just a collar. Invest in a good harness. Safety Seat for the Car–it has probably never crossed your mind, but, yes, there are safety seats for cars if you have a small dog. When traveling with your Poodle, make sure your pup is protected and buckled in. If you slam on the brakes, your lightweight fur baby could go flying right into the windshield. Toys – Don’t overdo it with toys. Getting piles of cheap toys your dog will chew through in a matter of days is not the best option. Invest in high-quality toys designed for your dog’s weight and age. Clothes–While doggie vests, sweaters, and other pup clothes may seem ridiculous, if you live in an environment with harsh weather (freezing winters and scorching summers), the clothing will protect your pup from the elements. Dishes – make sure you buy bowls that are free from chemical agents that could poison your pet. Stainless steel is a better option than plastic.

City Life

Poodles can be small (Toy), medium (Miniature) or large (Standard). If you live in an apartment in the city, a Toy or Mini would be your best option. Toys and Minis don’t require a ton of exercise and can be happy in an apartment sized area. However, you must still be prepared for the rigors of grooming, paying for doggy day-care or a dog walker, and proper training for your pet. Even if you live in an apartment building, your dog will be interacting with other people and, likely, other pets. Be prepared to invest in all the necessary grooming tools you will need for the daily care of your Poodle and set up a welcoming environment with a great doggy bed. Remember, these super intelligent creatures will not tolerate being left alone for hours at a time. If you work 40 or more hours per week and have no other family in the home, rethink getting a Poodle.

Suburban/Country Life

If you live in the ’burbs with your spouse and kids, you probably have a lifestyle more conducive to having any sized Poodle. You will have more space for your dog to exercise, people will be around more frequently, and you most likely would have more time to attend to your Poodle’s grooming. You should also have plenty of opportunities for walking your dog, introducing your dog to other pets, and having the chance for your dog to interact with others regularly. The same can be true for country life, with the exception that your dog will have far more land to run on, could be trained to hunt, and could be a great companion for a farmer.

Final Thoughts

As with any breed, you need to be prepared to provide your Poodle with a proper home and lifestyle that matches its personality and temperament. Every breed has specific needs in terms of care and feeding, so make sure you are up to speed on the Poodle’s best lifestyle options.

What You Can Expect Being a Poodle Owner

What You Can Expect Being a Poodle Owner

What You Can Expect Being a Poodle Owner

Bringing a new pet home is a great, fun thing. But do you know what to expect? Have you studied up on the breed you are bringing home? Does it matter if you have a Toy Poodle, a Miniature Poodle, a Standard Poodle, or even a Poodle mix? Poodles are medium- to small-sized dogs with curly hair (not fur) and an exuberant personality. They are also great for families will play with kids, and will get along with other animals as long as they have been properly introduced. Their curly hair and floppy ears make Poodles absolutely adorable. But, before you choose to bring home a Poodle, find out what you can expect with behavior, care, and personality.

Personality, Temperament, and Traits

Poodles have a reputation for being French, snooty pups. But, the truth is that they are quite intelligent, a fairly well-behaved dog, and have many wonderful characteristics. They Are Dignified– proud, clever, and elegant. The true alpha dog They Are Easy to Train – intelligent and obedient, very task-oriented They Protect Their Pack – sensing guests before they arrive and using warning barks They Are Playful – love romping around and playing with the kids They Don’t Shed – they have hair instead of fur, which makes them hypoallergenic They Require Regular Grooming – you can do it, but study up first. Hire a groomer if you think you can’t handle it. They Require Little Exercise – a brisk walk once a day will keep your Poodle happy They Get Along with other Pets –you must socialize them when they are puppies Poodles are loyal, docile, affectionate, and extremely intelligent. They love an active family and can easily handle being the only animal in the family. Now, let’s look at some of the good and some of the bad that comes with owning a puppy.

Poodles: The Good

  • Intelligent – internationally recognized as the 2nd smartest breed
  • Easily Trained – task-oriented and highly focused
  • Do Not Require Much Exercise – just walk once a day or give yard time
  • Minimal Shedding – hair, not fur!
  • Very Gentle – not prone to aggression
  • Patient – love to learn
  • Obedient – make training easy and they are extremely loyal to the pack

Poodles: The Bad

  • Grooming Must Be Consistent – the wiry hair of the Poodle can get seriously tangled and matted without regular care
  • Bathe Regularly – helps with the hair care and will keep your Poodle from getting skin infections
  • Nails Monitored and Trimmed – they grow fast! Trim them every few weeks
  • Certain illnesses– they are prone to (see below)

Poodle Types

The types of Poodles are categorized by size:Standard Poodle (15 inches high, about 20 pounds), Miniature Poodle (10–15 inches tall, about 12 to 20 pounds), and Toy Poodle (10 inches or less, about 12 pounds). Standard Poodles were originally working and retrieving dogs and could be found herding on a farm or hunting with its owner; however, they can adapt to city living or suburban living.The Miniature Poodles and Toy Poodles can handle living in either a suburban home or an urban apartment. While there really is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog, the poodle almost is. Poodles produce less dander—the tiny stuff that sticks to your furniture and floats through the air to make you sneeze. All types of Poodles share this characteristic. The breed is also virtually odorless; people won’t walk into your home, take a sniff, and ask what kind of dog you have.

Poodle Emotions

Poodle Emotions

Your puppy must be a valued member of its pack. Once you have established a pack leader in the home (usually a parent), this will most likely be the person the Poodle bonds with. That also makes it the pack leader’s responsibility to give the dog an active life. Regular exercise, whether a walk or time in the yard and playtime with the familywill keep your dog energetic and mentally stimulated. Originally bred as water dogs, Poodles love to swim! However, if you allow your Poodle to swim, make sure to keep the dog’s hair and ears clean to avoid infections. Poodles tend to display symptoms of separation anxiety when the pack leader is absent. If your lifestyle includes an 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. work routine, you should seriously reconsider getting a Poodle. When they get super anxious, they get unruly or bark incessantly, which will not make the neighbors a fan of your new addition. These dogs need a lot of attention and interaction, which is why they are great dogs for disabled persons. Poodles have high emotional intelligence and understand they are needed.They can easily sense when their handler is in need and act accordingly. Being able to serve their human makes them very happy. Also, disabled people are less likely to leave a Poodle alone for an extended period of time. Despite your efforts to keep your pup healthy, there are some particular illness and diseases that Poodles are more prone to.

Possible Health Problems

Like any other breed of dog, the Poodle has its own unique set of health challenges. Poodles are susceptible to any number of conditions:

  • Epilepsy – neurological disorder causing seizures
  • Hip Dysplasia – malformation of the hip joint(s)
  • Addison’s Disease – a hormonal disorder
  • Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus – potentially fatal overfeeding
  • Thyroid Issues – hormonal symptoms
  • Hypoglycemia – high blood sugar
  • Collapsed Trachea – windpipe malfunction
  • Von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD) – a bleeding disorder caused by a protein deficiency
  • Sebaceous Adenitis – a skin condition

You can do some early reconnaissance to see if your Poodle dog is susceptible to any of these conditions by having the parents of the pup tested. The Poodle can live for 16–18 years and is one of the longest living breeds of dog. Anyone considering a Poodle must be ready for the long-term commitment and be prepared for many years of companionship.

Final Thoughts

From breed specifics to the Poodle personality, get to know the Poodle before you bring home a new curly-haired baby. Taking on this joyful, but highly trainable, the breed can give you a companion that doesn’t make you sneeze, will protect your home and can be a great and playful pal for your kids.