Your Poodle is a sweet,loving, little bundle of fluff. It waits for you to come home and play or snuggle at the end of a long day. It’s your inspiration to get out of the house and take long walks. It never judges you, always looks on with adoring eyes no matter what you’re doing and doesn’t refuse to go places with you just because you didn’t do your hair. Whether you have a StandardPoodle, a MiniaturePoodle, a Toy Poodle,or even a Poodle mix, you love your dog and want what’s best for your furry friend. It doesn’t matter if you just brought home a new puppy or you have an older dog, pet insurance is definitely something to look into. Poodles are intelligent animals and training is often easy for their owners. That said, there are inherent problems. They tend to get bored easily and look to entertain themselves, which could spell trouble for your shoes or even your furniture. Worse still, if left unattended, things like socks or pillows can become toys and may get swallowed. Occasionally, unauthorized walks may take place;sometimes in high traffic areas. These opportunities are hazardous to your pooch’s health and, sadly, things can happen that may seriously affect your dog’s future. Accidents happen, and while no one is to blame, the consequences can be dire. Insurance can help ease the financial burden on a family while they help their pet to recover from a medical situation though veterinary care.

Pet Insurance

No matter what size of Poodle you own, this breed also has a tendency toward certain health issues. When treated, your pet will likely live a longer and happier life, but your wallet may suffer. Having the right canine insurance for your breed of dog can go a long way to help out when your pet is in a crisis. It’s never a good feeling when finances make the choices for you. As pet parents, if you have the proper insurance for your Poodle, you could have coverage for breed-related issues, and their expenses, such as:

  • Addison’s Disease, which could cost around $2,400 to treat, per year
  • Cancer, which could cost anywhere from $5,000 to $25,000 to treat
  • Corneal Dystrophy, which could cost from $300 to $3,000
  • Cushing’s Disease, which could cost $500 to $200 to treat
  • Entropion, which could cost from $300 to $1,500
  • Epilepsy, which could cost $200 to $15,000
  • Hip Dysplasia, which could cost up to $6,000 or more
  • Legg-Perthes Disease, which could cost up to $4,000 to treat
  • Luxating Patella, which could cost $1,500 to $3,000 to treat
  • Mitral Valve Disease, which could cost up to $5,000 to treat
  • Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, which could cost $100 to$300 to treat
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy, which could cost as much as $3,000 per eye
  • Sebaceous Adenitis, which could cost $200 to $600 to treat
  • Stomach Bloat (also known as Torsion), which could cost as much as $7,500 per occurrence

While this isn’t a comprehensive list of health problems your Poodle could suffer from (including preexisting conditions), they are among the most common. And like health insurance for humans, there is a fluctuation in prices for canine insurance coverage with pet insurance companies. Much of this difference depends on the breed of dog, the area you live in, and whether they have any preexisting conditions or genetic predispositions for certain conditions in their bloodline.

You’ve Got It Covered

You’ve Got It Covered

Most insurance providers have a waiting period after signing up. In many cases, you can sign your pooch up today and within a couple of weeks have coverage for many things, such as accident protection, and illness, as well as orthopedic conditions. The waiting period for some coverage remains in effect simply to keep less-than-honest owners from contacting the insurance company and signing up for coverage when they see an issue crop up, then immediately turning it to the company—only to drop the insurance coverage after the payout. In many cases, the insurance company will require a veterinarian’s evaluation within the last six months before the insurance policy can take effect. They may also utilize this option to speed up the waiting period for things like orthopedic coverage. By submitting a report from your vet, the insurance company can evaluate the results and determine that your Poodle is eligible for immediate coverage based on the vet’s results. In other circumstances, they will expect you to wait the full waiting period to determine that something the vet has seen may or may not be considered a preexisting condition. The purpose of canine insurance coverage is to help you, their financial benefactor, to have the opportunity to give your dog the best chance they can in a medical situation. If your four-legged best friend requires surgery costing $5,000, wouldn’t you feel better knowing you had coverage that could reimburse you up to 80% of that cost?

Cost-Effective Insurance Cover

On average, insurance for a healthy Toy Poodle could run between $25 and $50 a month, $35 to $55 for a Standard Poodle, and somewhere in the middle for Miniature Poodles. Age, health, and genetics are usually a contributing factor to the price you’ll pay, as well as the deductible you’ll be expected to cover. However, compared to paying the full cost of emergency care out of pocket, having insurance coverage on your pet to help out can literally be a lifesaving option. These coverages don’t usually include yearly wellness costs, such as rabies, DHLPP, flea, tick, or heartworm preventatives, but some insurance companies offer wellness or healthy pet plans that may give you discounts on your monthly pricing or a break on your deductible if you can show proof you participate. With the right insurance plan, even normal situations can be less stressful, such as heat exhaustion, finding a hot spot, or ear infections.

Final Thoughts

While no one wants to think that their pet may have anything but the best in life, all pet owners want to be able to offer the best they can. With the promise of the right pet insurance policies, you’ll feel better making the decisions that are best for your Poodle. Isn’t it about time to start shopping for insurance coverage?