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We know that poodles are one of the best dog breeds out there, but is it possible they can get even cuter? When mixed with the small and spunky pomeranian, the answer is a resounding yes! Pomapoo is a lovely mix of these two breeds, but are they the right dog for everyone? Keep reading to learn more about this designer dog and decide if it’s the right choice for your family.

What is a Pomapoo?

A Pomapoo is a cross between a poodle and a pomeranian. It’s an attempt to take the best of both of these lovable dog breeds and combine them into one cuddly animal.

Pomeranians are a descendant of Arctic working dogs—though they are named for the Pomerania region that stretches between Germany and Poland. They are highly intelligent and have a lot of personality, and are most notable for their puffy cloud-like coats.

Pomapoos are a “cross-breed” between Pomeranians and poodles. Cross-breeds have become more popular since the 1990s as people have searched for something “new” in the dog world. These “breeds” like the Goldendoodle, Labradoodle, and others are wildly popular amongst families. But, they are not officially recognized as an official breed by the American Kennel Club because they are a cross of breeds.

However, the lack of official recognition doesn’t make these dogs any less lovable, and the Pomapoo is no exception! Pomapoos are kind, lovable dogs that are great for families. With low health risks and activities, and with a loyal love of people, these pups are adorable bundles who will quickly become a part of your family!

What Makes a Pomapoo Different from a Poodle or a Pomeranian?

In general, crossbreeds are somewhat of a surprise. Their personality and temperament can vary dramatically from litter to litter, and even from dog to dog. Unlike pure breeds, which have had generations and generations to create defined characteristics, these new cross-breeds are uncharted territory.

In general, you can expect a few things from a pomapoo to be roughly 5-15 pounds, highly intelligent, and to have fluffy fur and a lot of personality. But when it comes to temperament, appearance, personality, and training needs, pomapoos will vary widely depending on their genetics.

Pomapoos could be smaller and fluffier like a pomeranian, or the could be larger with curlier hair like a poodle. The texture will range from soft to wire-like, but regardless, the dog will have plenty of hair in a wide variety of colors. The dog’s grooming needs will depend on its particular coat, though it will require frequent grooming regardless.

Poodles need to be properly groomed roughly once every six weeks and need plenty of brushing in between to avoid matted fur. Pomeranians are equally high-maintenance in their grooming needs. Thus, the combination of the two means you will spend plenty of time taking care of your dog’s coat.

Oliver ridin’ on E-Z street – from @oliverthedogx

Personality

In terms of temperament and personality, your pomapoo could also fall anywhere. They can be on the spectrum between the reserved poodle and exuberant pomeranian. Both poodles and Pomeranians are both friendly dogs, but poodles tend to be more reserved while Pomeranians lean toward extraversion. Your dog could fall on either side of the line, but in any case, it’s important to socialize the dog from a young age.

Exercise will also vary depending on your dog. While Pomeranians require relatively little exercise, poodle exercise needs vary depending on their type. A good rule of thumb is to look at your dog’s size: the bigger the dog, the more exercise it needs.

You also might find that your dog enjoys splashing through the water. This is the poodle side of the equation coming out to play. People originally bred Poodles as retrieving dogs, so they have an innate love of the water! Swimming is a great form of exercise for your dog!

Training Needs

Pomeranians tend to be stubborn dogs, while poodles are more naturally obedient. Your dog will fall somewhere on this spectrum. This duality in personality might make training these dogs difficult, but the good news is that like a cross between two highly intelligent breeds, pomapoos will learn fast.

Pomeranians are generally easy to train, with the largest training issue being the fact that they can be difficult to housebreak. As with any toy-sized dog, housebreaking is a problem because your pet can find hidden places to pee. If you don’t know that your dog is peeing in the house, then you can’t change its behavior and teach it otherwise, and the bad habit will persist.

Your pomapoo might also have this problem, especially if it is small. To avoid this, you should start potty training as early as possible. Have a consistent place where the dog can pee, and take him out several times a day to do his business.

If you do discover an accident in the house, clean up the mess quickly and quietly and continue with training, but don’t punish the dog. You should also limit your dog’s freedom in your home until it is fully trained.

Best Practice

Poodles are obedient dogs and train easily. As intelligent dogs though, they get bored quickly. Your pomapoo will likely carry this training flaw to a certain extent, so plan for short, regularly scheduled training sessions throughout the day.

Pomeranians and poodles both learn best with consistent training and positive reinforcement. They also do not respond well to punishment. Never hit, raise your voice, or try to dominate the dog in any way, as this will only build more fear and anxiety in the animal. Instead, focus on what the dog does right, and give her lots of praise, pets, treats, and rewards for good behavior.

Is It the Right Dog for You?

Pomapoos are guaranteed to be lovable. They are intelligent, and fun dogs to have around your home. But if you are looking for a low-maintenance dog that has a steady, predictable personality, you might want to consider another breed. Like a cross between two wonderful but very different dogs, pomapoo personalities and needs will vary greatly from dog-to-dog.

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